Yemen – Oil leaks threaten Red Sea marine life and residents in Aden

24

Location: Aden, Yemen

Language: Arabic

Duration: 00:03:09

Voice: Natural

Source: A24 Aden

Restriction: A24 subscribers

Date: 29/08/2022

Storyline:

Despite warnings of serious adverse effects on the environment, oil spills from dilapidated ships continue to threaten Red Sea marine life and residents of the city of Aden.

Local environmental official Walid Al-Shuaibi told A24 that the oil leaks would continue as long as the dilapidated ships were in the navigation course of the port of Aden.

Al-Shuaibi said authorities need to enforce  Yemeni laws and remove these ships to dismantle and get rid of them permanently.

Official reports document that 12 dilapidated vessels in the port of Aden are likely to sink and are no longer seaworthy due to the end of their life span.

Shot list:

Soundbite (Walid Al-Shuaibi – Director General of the General Administration of Monitoring and Environmental Impact Assessment at the Environmental Protection Authority of Yemen):

“The leak happens two and three times a month, and sometimes more. This thing cannot be monitored daily. The leakage will continue for a long time as long as the ships are in the navigation path of the port of Aden. It is not possible to remove this leakage and protect the navigational path or the marine environment in this area except by taking strict decisions to take these ships to the coast and dismantle them in accordance with Yemeni laws and legislations related to this field.”

Soundbite (Walid Al-Shuaibi – Director General of the General Administration of Monitoring and Environmental Impact Assessment at the Environmental Protection Authority of Yemen):

“This pollution has negative effects. There are environmental effects on marine life, which also cause the transmission of these ring carbon materials and the toxic materials that make up these oils that are swallowed and eaten by fish and transferred directly to humans, leading to cancerous diseases. There are also economic and social effects in terms of fish dying or poisoning, which will prevent Aden people from this meal. We know how many families live off fishing in this area, and therefore it may cause great harm to families of these fishermen.”

You might also like

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.